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August 24, 2009, at 09:31 AM by StarNamer -- Added reference to Debian mailing lists
Added lines 5-11:

If you are using Debian on you NSLU2, you should probaly use the Debian lists. For details see:

    http://lists.debian.org/

Warning: the Debian lists are not spam-protected like the Yahoo-hosted NSLU2 lists. You might want to use some sort of "throw away" email address to post to them from.

July 29, 2009, at 08:58 PM by Legrandin -- Recovery from a bad FLASH
Deleted line 112:
Added lines 114-137:

How can I recover from a bad FLASH?

  1. Use upslug2 or the Linksys utility to write the latest Debian installer on the NSLU2
  2. Connect to device and proceed through the menu system until you have retrieved the pieces needed to access your USB driver. Do not re-partition it!
  3. Exit into a shell
  4. Mount the drive under /target
  5. If you have any swap partition, activate it with swapon
  6. Finally execute:
mount -o bind /dev/ /target/dev
mount -t proc none /target/proc
chroot /target
flash-kernel
exit
umount /target/dev
umount /target/proc
umount /target
reboot

October 28, 2008, at 03:41 PM by frank -- add line about dash for saving memory
Added lines 35-36:
Switching the default shell from *bash* to *dash* saves another chunk of memory
March 15, 2008, at 09:09 PM by Martin Manscher -- Link to more memory tweaks
Added lines 35-36:
See also http://www.cyrius.com/debian/nslu2/reducing-memory.html
February 17, 2008, at 10:39 PM by rednuht --
Added lines 108-114:

External resources

http://www.cyrius.com/debian/nslu2/reducing-memory.html Reducing memory usage http://www.cyrius.com/debian/nslu2/linux-on-flash.html Reducing wear and tear on flash drives

February 17, 2008, at 10:37 PM by rednuht --
Added lines 50-58:
remember to run
telinit q
to reload the file
January 23, 2008, at 12:47 AM by fcarolo -- problem reports to the mailing list, please
Changed lines 59-60 from:
I have the latest RC2? Debian kernel "2.6.18-5-ixp4xx #1 Sun Dec 23 05:17:39 UTC 2007 armv5tel GNU/Linux" the problem is not fixd. Adding tickadj parameter did not change the problem; I am gaining 10 minutes every 1 1/2 day. My NSLU is runnign realtime monitoring of my utility meter and manage my X10 Home automation system. Time is a critical feature in such an environment (like starting your coffee machine at 7am etc....). I have my ntp dameon running all the time. But it does not sync time that often.... WHne? I shutdown restart the ntp dameon it syncs and put time back on. Any idea where i can find progress on this?
to:
Note by titioft: I have the latest RC2 Debian kernel "2.6.18-5-ixp4xx #1 Sun Dec 23 05:17:39 UTC 2007 armv5tel GNU/Linux" the problem is not fixd. Adding tickadj parameter did not change the problem; I am gaining 10 minutes every 1 1/2 day. My NSLU is runnign realtime monitoring of my utility meter and manage my X10 Home automation system. Time is a critical feature in such an environment (like starting your coffee machine at 7am etc....). I have my ntp dameon running all the time. But it does not sync time that often.... When I shutdown restart the ntp dameon it syncs and put time back on. Any idea where i can find progress on this? -- Please use the mailing list to report problems and ask for help.
January 22, 2008, at 08:48 PM by titioft -- Keeping Time with kernel 2.6.18-5 still does not work!
Changed lines 59-60 from:
to:
I have the latest RC2? Debian kernel "2.6.18-5-ixp4xx #1 Sun Dec 23 05:17:39 UTC 2007 armv5tel GNU/Linux" the problem is not fixd. Adding tickadj parameter did not change the problem; I am gaining 10 minutes every 1 1/2 day. My NSLU is runnign realtime monitoring of my utility meter and manage my X10 Home automation system. Time is a critical feature in such an environment (like starting your coffee machine at 7am etc....). I have my ntp dameon running all the time. But it does not sync time that often.... WHne? I shutdown restart the ntp dameon it syncs and put time back on. Any idea where i can find progress on this?
August 26, 2007, at 04:46 PM by Rob Lockhart -- Added notes about xauth and SSH for Debian
Added line 77:
Added lines 79-92:

How do I get X applications to correctly forward over SSH to my X server with Debian/NSLU2 ?

To make X forwarding work, you need:
  1. An X server on your local machine
  2. Access to the X server from your ssh client (running it in an xterm works)
  3. You need to connect to the NSLU2 with ssh -X
    (you must specify -X or it won't work; you may be able to get around this by changing one of ssh's configuration files)
  4. You need xauth installed on the NSLU2 (it's in xbase-clients Debian package so do apt-get install xbase-clients as root)
Now, just ssh -X user@NSLU2_IP_ADDRESS should allow you to re-display Xwindows applications to your X server.
Thanks to David Given for these instructions.

August 23, 2007, at 11:46 AM by ano --
Changed lines 80-81 from:

=InstallingSoftware= =Debian/Compiling=

to:
August 23, 2007, at 11:45 AM by ano --
Changed lines 78-82 from:

How can I compile programs / drivers from source?

Do I need to install all packages that are included in build-essential ?
What is the meaning of "make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.18-4-ixp4xx/build: No such file or directory. Stop." ?
to:

How can I install / compile additional programs / drivers?

=InstallingSoftware= =Debian/Compiling=

August 23, 2007, at 11:33 AM by ano --
Changed lines 80-82 from:
The default debian install doesn't
to:
Do I need to install all packages that are included in build-essential ?
What is the meaning of "make: *** /lib/modules/2.6.18-4-ixp4xx/build: No such file or directory. Stop." ?
August 23, 2007, at 10:27 AM by ano --
Changed lines 75-80 from:
If you install to flash, you'll want to spare it as many writes as you can, so mount it with the 'noatime' parameter. Set the syslog defaults in /etc/default to "-m 0" to disable periodic MARK entries to the file. Specifically, add "SYSLOGD="-m 0" to /etc/default/syslogd.
to:
If you install to flash, you'll want to spare it as many writes as you can, so mount it with the 'noatime' parameter. Set the syslog defaults in /etc/default to "-m 0" to disable periodic MARK entries to the file. Specifically, add "SYSLOGD="-m 0" to /etc/default/syslogd.

How can I compile programs / drivers from source?

The default debian install doesn't
August 19, 2007, at 09:42 PM by dumfrac -- Clean up formatting
Changed lines 38-39 from:
Replace the line the /etc/inittab
to:
Replace the line the /etc/inittab
Changed lines 43-45 from:
by
to:
with
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to:
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Added line 67:
August 19, 2007, at 09:37 PM by dumfrac -- Add note about items moved to the troubleshooting page.
Added lines 3-4:

This is a page of frequently asked questions for NSLU2. Please see the Troubleshooting page for troubleshooting tips. A few of the items that previously existed on this page have been moved to the Troubleshooting page.

August 19, 2007, at 09:32 PM by dumfrac -- Move some items to the Troubleshooting page
Changed lines 16-23 from:

After flashing the installer, I cannot ssh or ping the NSLU2.

Quoting from Martin Michlmayr's installation instructions (with some additional formatting),
"Regardless of which image you intend to use, you should configure your network settings (IP address, DNS, hostname) using the web interface before flashing the debian-installer image in case you do not want to use DHCP. Debian's installer will use those settings to bring up the network.
"Please note that if you use a static IP configuration, you have to specify all information, including netmask, gateway and DNS. If you don't specify all information, debian-installer will not be able to bring up the network and there's currently no way to tell the user that an error has occurred. An incomplete network configuration has so far been the most common reasons for problems with these images, so please make sure you have filled in all values."
to:

How can I reduce the memory footprint of my Debian install ?

Debian-Etch comes with two Network sharing protocol's enabled by default and if you then add SAMBA thats a total of three
  1. Netatalk
  2. NFS
If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers consider removing the netatalk package. You will free 4 Mb of RAM. Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS, this service should be disabled. You can follow the procedure below, or use rcconf (apt-get install rcconf).
mv /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server  /etc/rc2.d/K20nfs-kernel-server
mv /etc/rc2.d/S21nfs-common  /etc/rc2.d/K21nfs-common
Also the default Debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed consider removing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM.
Changed lines 34-47 from:

Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory.
Solution: Restart the installer by power cycling the NSLU2. Wait for the beeps, then ssh in as before. Follow the steps up to disk partitioning, and then use the partman manual partitioning mode to do the following:
  1. Delete all partitions the installer has created.
  2. Create a new primary swap partition that is at least 128MB.
  3. Create a new primary EXT3 partition, to be mounted on "/", and set it active.
  4. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally
Alternate solution: I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. The format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaller 40 GB partition as / mount point it worked well.
It has been reported that creating a swap partition a primary partition, SSH will fail during formatting every time, but if you make it a logical partition it works.
Another possibility: Create the partitions on another Linux machine using (c)fdisk and mk2fs.ext3 and then start the NSLU2 debian installer, choose manual partitioning and set the ext3 partition as root (/).
to:

How do I change the function of the power button on the NSLU2 to shut the system down as opposed to rebooting it?

Replace the line the /etc/inittab
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now
by
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -h now
Changed lines 46-53 from:

I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug or the RTC not working (see below)
To fix the network configuration you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.
The original file should look something like this.
to:

How do I know why my NSLU2 failed to boot when I have no console?

Attach the USB stick/drive to another computer and check the logs in <path-to-USB-drive>/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files to implement a fix.

Why isn't my real time clock keeping time?

The NSLU2 will not keep time with the Debian 2.6.17 kernel. The problem has been fixed in 2.6.18, which is the Linux kernel that is shipped with Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (etch). If for some reason you can't upgrade your kernel, you can temporarily fix the problem without by using tickadj to set the kernel ticks to 10101. You need to do this every time the NSLU2 is turned on.

Why is apt-get returning a segmentation fault?

If apt-get quits with a 'Segmentation Fault', remove the APT cache files in /var/cache/apt.
Changed lines 60-79 from:
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
        address 192.168.1.100
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        network 192.168.1.0
        broadcast 192.168.1.255
        gateway 192.168.1.1
        # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
        dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
        dns-search example.org
to:
rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin
Changed lines 62-88 from:
Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it. The fixed /etc/network/interfaces file should now look like this
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
#allow-hotplug eth0
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
        address 192.168.0.70
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        network 192.168.0.0
        broadcast 192.168.0.255
        gateway 192.168.0.1
        # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
        dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9K21nfs-common 
        dns-search example.org
to:
Then rerun apt-get again. This problem was caused by a bug in the Debian kernel and has been fixed in the kernel source version 2.6.18.dfsg.1-9. See Debian bug #401980 for more information.
Deleted lines 64-147:

The slug hangs during reboot (stuck on orange LED, no HD activity.)

As per the nslu2-utils README.Debian, a solid orange status LED means that the system is in the process of loading the initramfs from flash. If the system doesn't come out of this state, then something has gone wrong during the initramfs load, and the root filesystem hasn't mounted.
This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console. On an existing system, the most likely cause of this is due to fsck having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.
To fix this, edit /etc/default/rcS and set FSCKFIX=yes. If your slug is hanging, you can edit this file by mounting the disk on another computer and editing the file from there. Upon reboot the slug may take a long time as it performs a full fsck run, but the disk activity lights will show you that it hasn't hung. After the fsck the slug will finish booting.
Another cause of the initramfs not completing is because the root filesystem device wasn't found. If your system's root filesystem is on RAID or LVM, or you've just upgraded your system, your initramfs might not be quite right. Fiddling with the initramfs isn't particularly hard -- you can mount the system disk on another machine, and it's just a regular initramfs (cpio.gz) format -- but the slug is a bit different to a regular x86 machine, because it doesn't read the initramfs off disk. It reads it from flash. So to get your new and improved initramfs working, you need to write it to flash.
Since your initramfs is toast, you can't simply boot up and run flash-kernel. Instead, you need to either use upslug2 or the NSLU2 equivalent of a rescue disk to re-flash.
The upslug2 option
You need to make a new image containing the new initramfs to send to the device. Don't be fooled by the documentation -- the -r and -k options don't work for Debian-on-slug, because of the APEX bootloader (thanks to Rod Whitby for pointing that out to me). The easiest way to create a new image is to use the slugimage utility (from the Debian package of the same name) to unpack an existing firmware image (such as the default di-nslu2.bin), replace the initramfs (and maybe the kernel if you're feeling eager), then repack the new image ready for loading into your upgrade-mode slug with upslug2. One point to note is that you need to pass slugimage the -L option (with the location of your APEX image, such as -L apex.bin) so that you don't get the dreaded "Ran out of flash space in <Kernel>" message.
The "rescue disk" option
In this case, you want to download the standard etch firmware from Martin Michlmayr's tarball install, write it to the slug with upslug2, then reboot and write the new initramfs (which you've presumably left on the system's hard drive after modifying it) using flash-kernel.
This may also be due to the RTC not being setup (described below) as Debian etch tries to access the hwclock during system startup (/etc/rcS.d/S11hwclock), which is called before the LED is switched to green.

How can I reduce the memory footprint of my Debian install

Debian-Etch comes with two Network sharing protocol's enabled by default and if you then add SAMBA thats a total of three
  1. Netatalk
  2. NFS
If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers consider removing the netatalk package. You will free 4 Mb of RAM. Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS, this service should be disabled. You can follow the procedure below, or use rcconf (apt-get install rcconf).
mv /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server  /etc/rc2.d/K20nfs-kernel-server
mv /etc/rc2.d/S21nfs-common  /etc/rc2.d/K21nfs-common
Also the default Debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed consider removing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM.

The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LED green)

If the activity light on the USB hard disk is flashing every few seconds, and the network is not yet up, this could be due to hwclock hanging. Sometimes the internal RTC on the slug does not work. In this case the hwclock init script hangs trying to read the RTC. To fix, remove and replace the battery to reset the RTC. As a temporary fix, can connect the disk to another computer and delete the hwclock script link from /etc/rcS.d.

After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2 installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

This behavior has been observed when logging in from a Debian Sarge machine. Logging in from a Debian Etch machine results in the successful display of the installer.

How do I change the function of the power button on the NSLU2 to shut the system down as opposed to rebooting it?

Replace the line the /etc/inittab
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now
by
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -h now

How do I know why my NSLU2 failed to boot when I have no console?

Attach the USB stick/drive to another computer and check the logs in <path-to-USB-drive>/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files to implement a fix.

Why isn't my real time clock keeping time?

The NSLU2 will not keep time with the Debian 2.6.17 kernel. The problem has been fixed in 2.6.18, which is the Linux kernel that is shipped with Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (etch). If for some reason you can't upgrade your kernel, you can temporarily fix the problem without by using tickadj to set the kernel ticks to 10101. You need to do this every time the NSLU2 is turned on.

apt-get segmentation faults

If apt-get quits with a 'Segmentation Fault', remove the APT cache files in /var/cache/apt.
rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin
Then rerun apt-get again. This problem was caused by a bug in the Debian kernel and has been fixed in the kernel source version 2.6.18.dfsg.1-9. See Debian bug #401980 for more information.

August 06, 2007, at 05:43 PM by Farhan Yousaf -- Add specific entry for syslogd
Changed line 186 from:
If you install to flash, you'll want to spare it as many writes as you can, so mount it with the 'noatime' parameter. Set the syslog defaults in /etc/default to "-m 0" to disable periodic MARK entries to the file.
to:
If you install to flash, you'll want to spare it as many writes as you can, so mount it with the 'noatime' parameter. Set the syslog defaults in /etc/default to "-m 0" to disable periodic MARK entries to the file. Specifically, add "SYSLOGD="-m 0" to /etc/default/syslogd.
July 29, 2007, at 06:30 PM by tenfoot --
Added lines 118-120:
This may also be due to the RTC not being setup (described below) as Debian etch tries to access the hwclock during system startup (/etc/rcS.d/S11hwclock), which is called before the LED is switched to green.
July 05, 2007, at 11:26 AM by mpalmer -- Add notes about how to create custom flash images to repair your initramfs
Changed lines 100-101 from:
This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console, most probably due to having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.
to:
As per the nslu2-utils README.Debian, a solid orange status LED means that the system is in the process of loading the initramfs from flash. If the system doesn't come out of this state, then something has gone wrong during the initramfs load, and the root filesystem hasn't mounted.
This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console. On an existing system, the most likely cause of this is due to fsck having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.
Added lines 106-117:
Another cause of the initramfs not completing is because the root filesystem device wasn't found. If your system's root filesystem is on RAID or LVM, or you've just upgraded your system, your initramfs might not be quite right. Fiddling with the initramfs isn't particularly hard -- you can mount the system disk on another machine, and it's just a regular initramfs (cpio.gz) format -- but the slug is a bit different to a regular x86 machine, because it doesn't read the initramfs off disk. It reads it from flash. So to get your new and improved initramfs working, you need to write it to flash.
Since your initramfs is toast, you can't simply boot up and run flash-kernel. Instead, you need to either use upslug2 or the NSLU2 equivalent of a rescue disk to re-flash.
The upslug2 option
You need to make a new image containing the new initramfs to send to the device. Don't be fooled by the documentation -- the -r and -k options don't work for Debian-on-slug, because of the APEX bootloader (thanks to Rod Whitby for pointing that out to me). The easiest way to create a new image is to use the slugimage utility (from the Debian package of the same name) to unpack an existing firmware image (such as the default di-nslu2.bin), replace the initramfs (and maybe the kernel if you're feeling eager), then repack the new image ready for loading into your upgrade-mode slug with upslug2. One point to note is that you need to pass slugimage the -L option (with the location of your APEX image, such as -L apex.bin) so that you don't get the dreaded "Ran out of flash space in <Kernel>" message.
The "rescue disk" option
In this case, you want to download the standard etch firmware from Martin Michlmayr's tarball install, write it to the slug with upslug2, then reboot and write the new initramfs (which you've presumably left on the system's hard drive after modifying it) using flash-kernel.
July 01, 2007, at 03:44 PM by neo -- format ext3
Added line 38:
Another possibility: Create the partitions on another Linux machine using (c)fdisk and mk2fs.ext3 and then start the NSLU2 debian installer, choose manual partitioning and set the ext3 partition as root (/).
June 23, 2007, at 02:51 PM by dumfrac -- Add note about making swap a logical partition.
Changed lines 34-36 from:
Alternate solution

I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. The format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

to:
Alternate solution: I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. The format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaller 40 GB partition as / mount point it worked well.
It has been reported that creating a swap partition a primary partition, SSH will fail during formatting every time, but if you make it a logical partition it works.
June 23, 2007, at 12:49 PM by dumfrac -- Fix formatting
Changed lines 18-23 from:

Quoting from Martin Michlmayr's installation instructions (with some additional formatting),

"Regardless of which image you intend to use, you should configure your network settings (IP address, DNS, hostname) using the web interface before flashing the debian-installer image in case you do not want to use DHCP. Debian's installer will use those settings to bring up the network.

"Please note that if you use a static IP configuration, you have to specify all information, including netmask, gateway and DNS. If you don't specify all information, debian-installer will not be able to bring up the network and there's currently no way to tell the user that an error has occurred. An incomplete network configuration has so far been the most common reasons for problems with these images, so please make sure you have filled in all values."

to:
Quoting from Martin Michlmayr's installation instructions (with some additional formatting),
"Regardless of which image you intend to use, you should configure your network settings (IP address, DNS, hostname) using the web interface before flashing the debian-installer image in case you do not want to use DHCP. Debian's installer will use those settings to bring up the network.
"Please note that if you use a static IP configuration, you have to specify all information, including netmask, gateway and DNS. If you don't specify all information, debian-installer will not be able to bring up the network and there's currently no way to tell the user that an error has occurred. An incomplete network configuration has so far been the most common reasons for problems with these images, so please make sure you have filled in all values."
May 30, 2007, at 06:44 PM by amichelf --
Changed lines 35-36 from:

I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. Th format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

to:

I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. The format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

May 30, 2007, at 06:44 PM by amichelf --
Changed lines 35-36 from:

I had that problrm with my 500 GB WD My Book. Th format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

to:

I had that problem with my 500 GB WD My Book. Th format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

May 30, 2007, at 06:42 PM by amichelf -- Alternate solution - create smaller partitions
Changed lines 32-33 from:
  1. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
to:
  1. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally
Alternate solution

I had that problrm with my 500 GB WD My Book. Th format process ran out of memory because I wanted to format a 500 GB partition. When I created a smaler 40 GB partition as / mountpoint it worked well

May 19, 2007, at 07:14 PM by Ed -- add more disk i/o reduction ideas
Changed lines 160-162 from:

How can I avoid swapping?

The default debian install doesn't know that you only have 32 MB of RAM, so to save memory, you can tweak what you're running by default. One place to do this is in inittab - comment out the getty running on the serial port, and comment out the virtual terminal gettys. Also, if you chose Fileserver as an install option, be aware that you're automatically running NFS, Samba AND Appletalk - surely you can disable some or all of them. I did this, and was able to run my Slug w/no swap enabled.
to:

How can I avoid swapping / beating up my flashdrive?

The default debian install doesn't know that you only have 32 MB of RAM, so to save memory, you can tweak what you're running by default. One place to do this is in inittab - comment out the getty running on the serial port, and comment out the virtual terminal gettys. Also, if you chose Fileserver as an install option, be aware that you're automatically running NFS, Samba AND Appletalk - surely you can disable some or all of them. I did this, and was able to run my Slug w/no swap enabled. Make sure you disable ipv6 if you don't need it, and check `lsmod` output to see if there's crud in there that you don't need.
If you install to flash, you'll want to spare it as many writes as you can, so mount it with the 'noatime' parameter. Set the syslog defaults in /etc/default to "-m 0" to disable periodic MARK entries to the file.
May 19, 2007, at 03:34 AM by Ed -- added bit to show how to customize to avoid swap
Added lines 158-162:

How can I avoid swapping?

The default debian install doesn't know that you only have 32 MB of RAM, so to save memory, you can tweak what you're running by default. One place to do this is in inittab - comment out the getty running on the serial port, and comment out the virtual terminal gettys. Also, if you chose Fileserver as an install option, be aware that you're automatically running NFS, Samba AND Appletalk - surely you can disable some or all of them. I did this, and was able to run my Slug w/no swap enabled.
May 18, 2007, at 02:56 PM by dumfrac -- Add a seperation line between questions
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Added line 128:

Added line 140:

Added line 146:

Added line 151:

May 18, 2007, at 02:54 PM by dumfrac -- Add question about the situation of being unable to ping/ssh the NSLU2 after flashing the installer.
Changed lines 13-20 from:
to:

After flashing the installer, I cannot ssh or ping the NSLU2.

Quoting from Martin Michlmayr's installation instructions (with some additional formatting),

"Regardless of which image you intend to use, you should configure your network settings (IP address, DNS, hostname) using the web interface before flashing the debian-installer image in case you do not want to use DHCP. Debian's installer will use those settings to bring up the network.

"Please note that if you use a static IP configuration, you have to specify all information, including netmask, gateway and DNS. If you don't specify all information, debian-installer will not be able to bring up the network and there's currently no way to tell the user that an error has occurred. An incomplete network configuration has so far been the most common reasons for problems with these images, so please make sure you have filled in all values."

May 02, 2007, at 03:46 AM by dumfrac -- Fix formatting
Changed line 140 from:
rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin
to:
rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin
May 02, 2007, at 03:45 AM by dumfrac -- Add question about apt-get segmentation faults (obsolete).
Added lines 136-142:

apt-get segmentation faults

If apt-get quits with a 'Segmentation Fault', remove the APT cache files in /var/cache/apt.
rm -rf /var/cache/apt/*.bin
Then rerun apt-get again. This problem was caused by a bug in the Debian kernel and has been fixed in the kernel source version 2.6.18.dfsg.1-9. See Debian bug #401980 for more information.
May 02, 2007, at 03:40 AM by dumfrac -- Add question about the real time clock that was on the front page (obsolete).
Changed lines 128-130 from:

How do I know why my NSLU2 failed to boot when I have no console ?

to:

How do I know why my NSLU2 failed to boot when I have no console?

Added lines 132-135:

Why isn't my real time clock keeping time?

The NSLU2 will not keep time with the Debian 2.6.17 kernel. The problem has been fixed in 2.6.18, which is the Linux kernel that is shipped with Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (etch). If for some reason you can't upgrade your kernel, you can temporarily fix the problem without by using tickadj to set the kernel ticks to 10101. You need to do this every time the NSLU2 is turned on.
April 23, 2007, at 07:29 PM by Simon Kellett --
Changed lines 131-133 from:
Attach the USB stick/drive to another computer and check the logs in

path-to-USB-drive/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files to implement a fix.

to:
Attach the USB stick/drive to another computer and check the logs in <path-to-USB-drive>/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files to implement a fix.
April 23, 2007, at 07:26 PM by Simon Kellett --
Changed line 132 from:

<path-to-USB-drive>/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files

to:

path-to-USB-drive/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files

April 23, 2007, at 07:25 PM by Simon Kellett -- add log viewing tip
Added lines 127-134:

How do I know why my NSLU2 failed to boot when I have no console ?

Attach the USB stick/drive to another computer and check the logs in

<path-to-USB-drive>/var/log. You can also edit the configuration files to implement a fix.

April 16, 2007, at 10:28 AM by karlheggmailcom -- The installer can fix the bad partitioning itself.
Changed line 17 from:
Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following:
to:
Solution: Restart the installer by power cycling the NSLU2. Wait for the beeps, then ssh in as before. Follow the steps up to disk partitioning, and then use the partman manual partitioning mode to do the following:
Changed lines 19-22 from:
  1. Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following:
  1. Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
  2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
to:
  1. Create a new primary swap partition that is at least 128MB.
  2. Create a new primary EXT3 partition, to be mounted on "/", and set it active.
April 13, 2007, at 10:17 PM by dumfrac -- Remove an auto matically generated Wiki link
Changed lines 114-115 from:

After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2? installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

to:

After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2 installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

April 13, 2007, at 10:16 PM by dumfrac -- Fix indentation
Changed line 125 from:

by

to:
by
April 13, 2007, at 10:16 PM by dumfrac -- Remove the words \"Question\" and \"ANSWER\"
Changed lines 3-5 from:

Question : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

ANSWER :

to:

What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

Changed lines 7-9 from:

Question : How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

ANSWER :

to:

How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

Changed lines 14-16 from:

Question : Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

ANSWER :

to:

Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

Changed lines 26-28 from:

Question : I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

ANSWER :

to:

I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

Changed lines 84-86 from:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (stuck on orange LED, no HD activity.)

ANSWER:

to:

The slug hangs during reboot (stuck on orange LED, no HD activity.)

Changed lines 91-93 from:

Question : How can I reduce the memory footprint of my Debian install

ANSWER :

to:

How can I reduce the memory footprint of my Debian install

Changed lines 109-111 from:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LED green)

ANSWER:

to:

The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LED green)

Changed lines 114-116 from:

Question: After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2? installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

ANSWER:

to:

After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2? installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

Changed lines 119-121 from:

Question: How do I change the function of the power button on the NSLU2 to shut the system down as opposed to rebooting it?

ANSWER: Replace the line the /etc/inittab

to:

How do I change the function of the power button on the NSLU2 to shut the system down as opposed to rebooting it?

Replace the line the /etc/inittab
April 13, 2007, at 10:13 PM by dumfrac -- Add a question about how to shutdown the NSLU2 using the power button in Debian/NSLU2
Added line 15:
Added line 28:
Added line 87:
Added line 114:
Changed line 117 from:

ANSWER :

to:

ANSWER:

Changed lines 123-124 from:

ANSWER :

This behavior has been observed when logging in from a Debian Sarge machine. Logging in from a Debian Etch machine results in the successful display of the installer.
to:

ANSWER:

This behavior has been observed when logging in from a Debian Sarge machine. Logging in from a Debian Etch machine results in the successful display of the installer.

Question: How do I change the function of the power button on the NSLU2 to shut the system down as opposed to rebooting it?

ANSWER: Replace the line the /etc/inittab

ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now

by

ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -h now
April 13, 2007, at 09:33 PM by anonymous -- Fixed S20nfs-kernel-server to K20nfs-kernel-server
Changed line 104 from:

mv /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server

to:

mv /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server /etc/rc2.d/K20nfs-kernel-server

April 10, 2007, at 02:54 PM by Matt Kleffner -- Added entry on non-displaying installer after login
Added lines 115-120:

Question: After successfully logging in to the Etch RC2? installer, via SSH over the NSLU2's onboard ethernet, the screen is cleared and nothing happens.

ANSWER :

This behavior has been observed when logging in from a Debian Sarge machine. Logging in from a Debian Etch machine results in the successful display of the installer.
March 25, 2007, at 03:58 AM by Peter Barker --
Changed lines 111-112 from:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LEDs? green)

to:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LED green)

March 25, 2007, at 03:56 AM by Peter Barker -- RTC hwclock problem
Changed lines 30-31 from:
This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug (see below)
to:
This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug or the RTC not working (see below)
Added lines 110-114:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (status and ethernet LEDs? green)

ANSWER :

If the activity light on the USB hard disk is flashing every few seconds, and the network is not yet up, this could be due to hwclock hanging. Sometimes the internal RTC on the slug does not work. In this case the hwclock init script hangs trying to read the RTC. To fix, remove and replace the battery to reset the RTC. As a temporary fix, can connect the disk to another computer and delete the hwclock script link from /etc/rcS.d.
March 22, 2007, at 03:38 AM by dumfrac -- Add a note about the Debian Way of enabling and disabling services
Changed lines 100-101 from:
If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers consider removing the netatalk package. You will free 4 Mb of RAM. Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS, this service should be disabled
to:
If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers consider removing the netatalk package. You will free 4 Mb of RAM. Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS, this service should be disabled. You can follow the procedure below, or use rcconf (apt-get install rcconf).
March 22, 2007, at 03:21 AM by dumfrac -- Argh! And hopefully the last one.
Changed line 109 from:

Also the default Debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed consider removing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM.

to:
Also the default Debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed consider removing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM.
March 22, 2007, at 03:20 AM by dumfrac -- One more formatting issue
Changed lines 59-60 from:

Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it. The fixed /etc/network/interfaces file should now look like this

to:
Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it. The fixed /etc/network/interfaces file should now look like this
March 22, 2007, at 03:19 AM by dumfrac -- And some more formatting fixes (preview would be great!)
Changed lines 30-35 from:

This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug (see below)

To fix the network configuration you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.

The original file should look something like this.

to:
This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug (see below)
To fix the network configuration you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.
The original file should look something like this.
Changed lines 57-58 from:
to:
Added line 101:
March 22, 2007, at 03:16 AM by dumfrac -- Fix some more formatting
Changed lines 86-90 from:

This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console, most probably due to having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.

To fix this, edit /etc/default/rcS and set FSCKFIX=yes. If your slug is hanging, you can edit this file by mounting the disk on another computer and editing the file from there. Upon reboot the slug may take a long time as it performs a full fsck run, but the disk activity lights will show you that it hasn't hung. After the fsck the slug will finish booting.

to:
This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console, most probably due to having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.
To fix this, edit /etc/default/rcS and set FSCKFIX=yes. If your slug is hanging, you can edit this file by mounting the disk on another computer and editing the file from there. Upon reboot the slug may take a long time as it performs a full fsck run, but the disk activity lights will show you that it hasn't hung. After the fsck the slug will finish booting.
Changed lines 94-100 from:

Debian-Etch comes with two Network sharing protocol's enabled by default and if you then add SAMBA thats a total of three 1) Netatalk 2) NFS

If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers concider removing the netatalk package. It uses 4Mbyte of RAM

Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS this should be disabled

to:
Debian-Etch comes with two Network sharing protocol's enabled by default and if you then add SAMBA thats a total of three
  1. Netatalk
  2. NFS
If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers consider removing the netatalk package. You will free 4 Mb of RAM. Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS, this service should be disabled
[@
Changed lines 103-106 from:

Also the default debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed concider un-installing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM

to:

@]

Also the default Debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed consider removing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM.

March 22, 2007, at 03:09 AM by dumfrac -- Fix formatting
Changed lines 81-82 from:
to:
Changed line 85 from:

Answer:

to:

ANSWER:

March 21, 2007, at 10:02 PM by Andy O'Neill --
Changed lines 6-7 from:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in README on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
to:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
March 21, 2007, at 10:01 PM by Andy O'Neill -- Changed the link text to the Debian README to read \"README\" instead of the full path.
Changed lines 6-7 from:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
to:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in README on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
March 21, 2007, at 09:59 PM by Andy O'Neill -- Added FSCK hang during boot fix
Changed lines 30-32 from:

The problem is that the network interface did not get properly setup. To fix this you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.

to:

This is probably due the network interface not being properly set up. It could also be due to the FSCK bug (see below)

To fix the network configuration you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.

Changed lines 82-89 from:
to:

Question: The slug hangs during reboot (stuck on orange LED, no HD activity.)

Answer:

This could be due to the slug waiting for a response on the console, most probably due to having found a problem during filesystem check on reboot. As described in the README, the slug can be set to automatically fix any errors found by fsck. The symptoms are similar to the network problem described above, although the boot hangs early on and the main LED remains amber.

To fix this, edit /etc/default/rcS and set FSCKFIX=yes. If your slug is hanging, you can edit this file by mounting the disk on another computer and editing the file from there. Upon reboot the slug may take a long time as it performs a full fsck run, but the disk activity lights will show you that it hasn't hung. After the fsck the slug will finish booting.

March 21, 2007, at 01:02 AM by naib --
Changed line 77 from:
        dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9
to:
        dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9K21nfs-common 
Changed lines 82-83 from:

Question : I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

to:

Question : How can I reduce the memory footprint of my Debian install

Changed lines 85-97 from:
to:

Debian-Etch comes with two Network sharing protocol's enabled by default and if you then add SAMBA thats a total of three 1) Netatalk 2) NFS

If you are not planning on communicating with Apple shares/printers concider removing the netatalk package. It uses 4Mbyte of RAM

Likewise if you are not planning on sharing out files via NFS this should be disabled mv /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server /etc/rc2.d/S20nfs-kernel-server mv /etc/rc2.d/S21nfs-common /etc/rc2.d/K21nfs-common

Also the default debian install has a message transfer agent enabled by default (exim4). If this is not needed concider un-installing it to free up 8Mbytes of RAM

March 21, 2007, at 12:54 AM by naib --
Added lines 80-84:

Question : I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

ANSWER :

March 02, 2007, at 02:13 PM by dumfrac -- Try formatting numbered list again
Changed lines 20-21 from:
# Delete all partitions the installer has created.
# Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
to:
  1. Delete all partitions the installer has created.
  2. Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Changed lines 23-26 from:
# Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
# From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
# Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
to:
  1. Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
  2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
  3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
March 02, 2007, at 01:59 PM by dumfrac -- Clean up some more formatting
Changed lines 20-21 from:
1. Delete all partitions the installer has created.
2. Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
to:
# Delete all partitions the installer has created.
# Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Changed lines 23-26 from:
1. Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
to:
# Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
# From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
# Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
Changed lines 31-36 from:

The problem is that the network interface did not get properly setup.

To fix this you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort.

The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first

to:

The problem is that the network interface did not get properly setup. To fix this you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort. The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first.

Deleted line 34:
Changed lines 56-58 from:

Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it.

Fixed /etc/network/interfaces

to:

Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it. The fixed /etc/network/interfaces file should now look like this

March 02, 2007, at 01:40 PM by dumfrac --
Changed lines 40-58 from:
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.100
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1
# dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
dns-search example.org
to:
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
        address 192.168.1.100
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        network 192.168.1.0
        broadcast 192.168.1.255
        gateway 192.168.1.1
        # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
        dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
        dns-search example.org
Changed lines 65-66 from:
 # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
 # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
to:
[@
  1. This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
  2. and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
Changed lines 69-71 from:
 # The loopback network interface
 auto lo
 iface lo inet loopback
to:
  1. The loopback network interface

auto lo iface lo inet loopback

Changed lines 73-84 from:
 # The primary network interface
 #allow-hotplug eth0
 auto eth0
 iface eth0 inet static
         address 192.168.0.70
         netmask 255.255.255.0
         network 192.168.0.0
         broadcast 192.168.0.255
         gateway 192.168.0.1
         # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
         dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9
         dns-search example.org
to:
  1. The primary network interface
  2. allow-hotplug eth0

auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static

        address 192.168.0.70
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        network 192.168.0.0
        broadcast 192.168.0.255
        gateway 192.168.0.1
        # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
        dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9
        dns-search example.org

@]

Deleted line 86:
March 02, 2007, at 01:23 PM by dumfrac -- Fix answer to question about copying flash (final)
Deleted lines 10-16:

(:table border=0 width=75% align=center bgcolor=#eeffee:) (:cell:)

$ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image

(:tableend:)

Changed line 12 from:
 $ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image
to:
$ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image
March 02, 2007, at 01:17 PM by dumfrac -- Fix answer to question about copying flash (preview 2)
Changed line 19 from:
$ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image
to:
 $ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image
March 02, 2007, at 01:14 PM by dumfrac -- Fix answer to question about copying flash (preview)
Changed line 14 from:

$ cat mtdblock* > image

to:

$ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image

Added lines 18-21:
$ cat /dev/mtdblock* > image
January 21, 2007, at 03:37 PM by Reedy Boy -- Added Fixed Example
Changed lines 64-65 from:
to:

Fixed /etc/network/interfaces

 # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
 # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

 # The loopback network interface
 auto lo
 iface lo inet loopback

 # The primary network interface
 #allow-hotplug eth0
 auto eth0
 iface eth0 inet static
         address 192.168.0.70
         netmask 255.255.255.0
         network 192.168.0.0
         broadcast 192.168.0.255
         gateway 192.168.0.1
         # dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
         dns-nameservers 212.159.13.49 212.159.13.50 212.159.6.9
         dns-search example.org
January 20, 2007, at 02:53 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 3-4 from:

**What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

to:

Question : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

Changed lines 8-9 from:

**How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

to:

Question : How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

Changed lines 18-19 from:

**Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

to:

Question : Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

Changed lines 30-31 from:

**I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

to:

Question : I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

January 20, 2007, at 02:51 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 3-4 from:

What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

to:

**What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

Changed lines 8-9 from:

How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

to:

**How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

Changed lines 18-19 from:

Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

to:

**Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

Changed lines 30-31 from:

I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

to:

**I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

January 20, 2007, at 02:51 AM by mrkzander --
Changed line 42 from:
to:
Changed lines 61-62 from:
to:

Comment out the 'allow-hotplug eth0' and add 'auto eth0' on the line after it.

January 20, 2007, at 02:50 AM by mrkzander --
Added line 39:
Changed lines 61-62 from:
to:
January 20, 2007, at 02:49 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 34-35 from:

For this you will need to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort serial port.

to:

The problem is that the network interface did not get properly setup.

To fix this you will need to edit a file on your USB drive/stick. This will require you to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a serial port http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort.

The fix is to edit the '/etc/network/interfaces' file. Make sure to back up the file first The original file should look something like this.

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
# The primary network interface
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.100
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1
# dns-* options are implemented by the resolvconf package, if installed
dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
dns-search example.org
January 20, 2007, at 02:39 AM by mrkzander --
Changed line 5 from:

ANSWER :

to:

ANSWER :

Changed lines 8-9 from:
  • How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?
to:

How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?

ANSWER :

Changed lines 18-19 from:
  • Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?
to:

Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?

ANSWER :

Changed lines 28-35 from:
3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
to:
3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.

I rebooted and now cannot contact the slug

ANSWER :

For this you will need to either mount the root partition on another machine or install a http://www.nslu2-linux.org/wiki/HowTo/AddASerialPort serial port.

January 20, 2007, at 02:36 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 3-4 from:

QUESTION : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

to:

What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

January 20, 2007, at 02:35 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 3-5 from:

QUESTION : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

ANSWER :

to:

QUESTION : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

ANSWER :

January 20, 2007, at 02:35 AM by mrkzander --
Changed lines 3-4 from:
  • What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?
to:

QUESTION : What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?

ANSWER :

January 12, 2007, at 07:32 PM by dumfrac -- Remove some wiki links
Changed lines 21-23 from:
2. Create a new primary EXT3? partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following:
1. Select the already created EXT3? partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
to:
2. Create a new primary EXT3 partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following:
1. Select the already created EXT3 partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
January 12, 2007, at 07:30 PM by dumfrac -- Remove text about the question should be moved to a more generic FAQ.
Deleted line 8:
This question is not Debian/NSLU2 specific, so should probably be moved to a more general FAQ. The answer is
January 12, 2007, at 08:52 AM by marcusb -- fold link into text
Changed lines 5-8 from:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the filesystem, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file
to:
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
January 12, 2007, at 08:45 AM by Anguel Stankov --
Changed lines 21-27 from:
This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory. Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following:

1. Delete all partitions the installer has created. 2. Create a new primary EXT3? partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active. Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following: 1. Select the already created EXT3? partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable. 2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition. 3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.

to:
This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory.
Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following:
1. Delete all partitions the installer has created.
2. Create a new primary EXT3? partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active.
Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following:
1. Select the already created EXT3? partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable.
2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition.
3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.
January 12, 2007, at 08:44 AM by Anguel Stankov --
Changed lines 21-22 from:
This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory.

Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following:

to:
This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory. Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following:
January 12, 2007, at 08:43 AM by Anguel Stankov -- Debian installer: Problem formatting the new ext3 partition
Added lines 18-28:
  • Installation fails when the installer starts to format the new ext3 partition. What can I do?
This can happen at 33% for example and the SSH connection closes. The reason is probably that the format process runs out of memory.

Solution: Connect your install drive (or USB stick) to a normal PC. Use a Linux utility or a Windows tool (e.g. Paragon Partition Manager or Partition Magic) to do the following: 1. Delete all partitions the installer has created. 2. Create a new primary EXT3? partition (but also leave space for a swap partition), format the ext3 and set it active. Reconnect your drive to the NSLU2 again. Launch Debian installer, select manual partitioning mode and do the following: 1. Select the already created EXT3? partition and tell the installer to use it as "/" *without* reformatting it! Make sure it is set as bootable. 2. From the remaining free space you left before create a logical SWAP partition. 3. Write the new settings to the drive and installation should continue normally.

January 12, 2007, at 04:11 AM by Steve Dalton --
Changed lines 7-8 from:
If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the drive, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file
to:
If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the filesystem, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file
January 12, 2007, at 04:11 AM by Steve Dalton --
Changed lines 7-8 from:

If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the drive, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file

to:
If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the drive, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file
January 12, 2007, at 04:11 AM by Steve Dalton -- Added link to Readme file
Added lines 7-8:

If you can't get onto your NSLU2 and are unable to look at the drive, you can access this file via the Debian subversion repository here: http://svn.debian.org/wsvn/pkg-nslu2-utils/trunk/debian/README.Debian?op=file

January 12, 2007, at 02:25 AM by dumfrac -- Let\'s try that again.
Changed line 10 from:
(:table border=0 width=75% align=center bgcolor=#eeffee:)
to:

(:table border=0 width=75% align=center bgcolor=#eeffee:)

January 12, 2007, at 02:24 AM by dumfrac -- Argh ! We have to fix the preview :-)
Changed line 10 from:
(:table border=0 width=80% bgcolor=#eeffee:)
to:
(:table border=0 width=75% align=center bgcolor=#eeffee:)
January 12, 2007, at 02:22 AM by dumfrac --
Changed line 10 from:

(:table border=0 width=80% align=right bgcolor=#eeffee:)

to:
(:table border=0 width=80% bgcolor=#eeffee:)
January 12, 2007, at 02:22 AM by dumfrac -- Suppress a bunch of wiki links
Changed lines 1-6 from:

NSLU2 FAQ

  • What do the LED colours and activity mean with NSLU2 ?
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a NSLU2 system.
to:

Debian/NSLU2 FAQ

  • What do the LED colours and activity mean with Debian/NSLU2 ?
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a Debian/NSLU2 system.
Changed lines 9-10 from:
This question is not NSLU2 specific, so should probably be moved to a more general FAQ. The answer is

(:table border=0 width=80% bgcolor=#eeffee:)

to:
This question is not Debian/NSLU2 specific, so should probably be moved to a more general FAQ. The answer is

(:table border=0 width=80% align=right bgcolor=#eeffee:)

January 12, 2007, at 02:18 AM by dumfrac -- Start a Debian/NSLU2 FAQ
Added lines 1-15:

NSLU2 FAQ

  • What do the LED colours and activity mean with NSLU2 ?
The meaning of the colours and activity are documented in /usr/share/doc/nslu2-utils/README.Debian on a NSLU2 system.
  • How do I get a copy of my currently flashed image ?
This question is not NSLU2 specific, so should probably be moved to a more general FAQ. The answer is

(:table border=0 width=80% bgcolor=#eeffee:) (:cell:)

$ cat mtdblock* > image

(:tableend:)